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Ukraine 49, Crimea 35, Russia 35, Israel 14, Moscow 10, Pradaxa 9, Viktor Yanukovych 8, Campbell 7, Nato 7, Bangkok 6, Us 5, Navy 4, North Korea 4, Mogadishu 4, Rasmussen 3, Black Sea 3, Nik Gowing 3, Angie 3, Brussels 3, The Oscars 2,
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  BBC America    BBC World News    International issues.  

    February 27, 2014
    6:00 - 7:00am EST  

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matthew! jenkins: she is as nasty a little whore as ever walked this city's streets. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com this is bbc america. and now, live from london, "bbc world news". hello. i'm nik gowing with "bbc world news". our top stories. crime becomes ukraine's national flashpoint. armed men seize the regional parliament. ukraine's be acting president warns russia against military aggression as parliament meets to confirm a new government. the crisis deepens. the former president appears asking moscow to guarantee his safety. that's according to reports from officials news agencies in russia.
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supporters of thailand's prime minister try to block her corruption hearing. she sends her legal team to answer the charges. hello, everyone. a series of fast-moving events in ukraine is where the government has put domestic security forces on high alert. the russian flag now flies over the regional parliament building in the capital. it is a potential flashpoint. it is home to the russian naval fleet at a massive base on the black sea. now a new twist.
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reports from official russian news agencies signal that viktor yanukovych is in russia after he fled rapidly on friday. he insists he is still ukraine's rightful head of state. well, let's find out what's happening in the regional capital of crimea. oleg, what have you seen? what are you seeing around those government buildings with russian flags? >> reporter: well, yesterday the center city was overly busy. today it's very silent,eerily silent. the place where the parliament is located and the house of ministersis score donned off by local police. now, they are guiding yet another police line -- not the police line, obviously. the people who took over those buildings in the early hours. who exactly are those people, we don't know. the latest reports say these are
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pro-russian crimean residents. they say they are not powered to go into any negotiations. just now we were checking reports about russian -- a group of russian armored personnel carriers on the outskits. but haven't found them. but military police, a group was there and went into the base. crucially they didn't tell us whose they were. the one station here in crimea or coming from elsewhere. >> what about the prime minister of crimea who did indicate a couple hours ago he believed he should be or would be able to talk to those who have taken the buildings? >> reporter: well, he gave his numbers for contact. that's pretty much all we have heard. some of the deputies are said to be going back into the buildings. this may be the continuation of yesterday's events. yesterday's demonstration were initiated by the supporters of
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the new authorities in ukraine who were trying to block the session of the regional parliament in crimea. the deputy announced some succession. whether they are now coming back to continue with those plans, we don't know for sure. >> let me ask you to broaden your thought here. you are seeing the emotions where there are strong russian population. there is also an anti-russian tata population. and now the clear suggestion from moscow that it will protect uncompromisingly, to use moscow's words, uncompromisingly russian human rights across ukraine. >> reporter: yes. this is tightening, and tightening every day into a geopolitical mode. the standoff between russians and non-russians here is not as strong as it would be somewhere
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else in ukraine. the communities have been living peacefully side to side. yes. right now the tatas are citing with the new authorities of ukraine, those who have taken over kiev. as a vast month skwroajority -- consider themselves pro-russian. she saw no other option but -- >> oleg boldyrev in the capital of crimea. this is becoming very serious down there. well, he was apparently spotted fleeing kiev just under a week ago under the cover of darkness. that was president viktor yanukovych shortly after he had been negotiating with the french, german and polish foreign ministers to get some new kind of deal which those in independence square in kiev didn't like and led to the
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extraordinary collapse of the hole system in ukraine over friday, saturday and sunday. let's go to our bbc's bridgett kendall in moscow. it appears he believes he is still president yanukovych has appeared or is now in russia. what is he saying to russian news agencies? >> reporter: just over the last hour or so, a statement from viktor yanukovych released to the three russian news agencies and read out on the tv channel in which he says he still consider himself ukraine's legal head of state. he believes the sessions taking place in the parliament are not legal. and he also said given, as you put hit, extremists had seized power in ukraine, he asked russia for protection. separately, russian news agencies said they had spoken to sources who had that request granted, which certainly seems
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to the the case if it is written over the russian airwaves. he did write that people in the crimea wouldn't accept what the government in kiev was doing. therefore he was prepared to step in again, work for compromise. according to that agreement he signed with the opposition and western powers. he seems to be speaking from an unknown location. we assume it's on russian territory. although his examine whereabouts have not been made clear. >> what is your reading of the fact that this has emerged through one of the official government news agencies and is quoting him directly. where does this mean russia is a aligning itself and what position is russia taking with the former president, although he says he is still the president? >> well, it feels like a pretty significant development. there was a lot of speculation about whether or not russia would even accept him. in fact, a senior
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parliamentarian only yesterday said, no, he was not on russian soil and he thought it very unlikely that russia would give him sanctuary. yet here he is not only apparently in russia, i mean, given protection by the russian authorities, but having his statement that he thinks the authorities in ukraine read out on the russian airwaves. it was read out on russian television. so it seems given that to have some authority of the russian state behind it. he's a russian state controlled channels and agencies. quite what it means in the battle that's been going on over who should be in control and what should happen in ukraine is difficult to read. it is slightly ominous given events this morning. these armed men who have taken over the parliament in the government in the crimea, not saying very much. but clearly putting up a russian
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flag on -- taking the side of russian speakers in crimea. we don't know if these events are linked, but it does seem quite odd that the former ukrainian president who, let's face it, has been denounced all over the place, including here in russia, should sutdly be given airspace on russian television. >> thanks for that update. intriguing. as the polish foreign minister of course said there are now dangerous turns taking place, particularly in what's happened in crimea. more from ukraine later in this program. we go now to the somali capital where a suicide car bomb exploded killing 12 people and wounding others. al shabaab said it carried out the attack. it was outside security services building in mogadishi. we have a reading on the security situation which has seen an increase in attacks
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suddenly recently. >> reporter: yes, exactly. it has been coming back in the past few weeks. today a car loaded with explosives was driven to a cafe near the headquarters of the somali intelligence areas. they have attacked the area. and several people, including some of the intelligence forces, were killed in the attack. some few days ago an attack was launched on the presidential palace in somalia where several people, including syria government officials, were killed. so this kind of attacks are becoming normal in mow ga dee shoe where the attacks have been not this rampant or coming back like this. so that the view from nairobi with that attack on a cafe in mogadishu.
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let's go back to the crew contain. regional and international fears are mount anything crimea. moscow has long had a massive strategic interest. there it is right down at the bottom of ukraine. it's crimea. when the soviet union broke up in 1991, ukraine became independent. well, in sevatopol, confirmation that they have been seized in the few hours. how might russia defend or decide to defend its interests? because in the last 24 hours, we have had confirmation of 150,000 russian troops being mobilized around the western military district. confirmation that air -- combat aircraft are being used in that area. and word from one particular location that special forces
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have been mobilized to move down into crimea. and the question is, this is a sovereign base of the russian armed forces. all those armed forces anywhere else would have the legitimate right to end up there and get their pretty covertly. what is helping in simferopol? mark loewen sent this report. >> reporter: the russian flag flies here. overnight, around 50 unidentified armed gunmen forced their way inside the parliament building, past the barricades there and there was some exchange of gunfire. and they are still holed up inside the parliament building. they are currently under way to try to negotiate an end to the standoff. you can see outside the parliament building, pro-russia demonstrators have gathered.
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they were further down the square. they are pushing police lines. it was previously cordoned off by police. they are chanting they are saying we have waited for this moment for 20 years. that they want a united russia. now, this is of course the biggest challenge for the new ukrainian government. these people say that illegitimate protesters seized the government in ukraine and they say they intend to do exactly the same now here in crimea. >> mark lowen in simferopol. elections on the 25th of may. in thailand, the prime minister sent lawyers to answer charges of negligence brought against her by the anti-corruption commission. some 300 supporters tried to stop the hearing by chaining the
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gate to block access for the officials who work there. the prime minister faces charges of mishandling a scheme but she left bangkok before the hearing was due to start. let us -- i'm pausing there because we want to go to nato in brussels where the secretary-general rasmussen. there's been a meeting of defense ministers. obviously ukraine right on the borders of nato, on the borders of poland is a core challenge and worry for nato security. >> that concludes the public parts of our meeting. and i thank the media for their attendance. >> that's all we're going to see. we unfortunately arrived a bit late. normally these sessions happen
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behind closed doors. that was a very public piece of the meeting of defense ministers in brussels. we were talking about what's happening in bangkok. she's been indicted for alleged criminality in a rice scheme. >> reporter: this is the first time we have seen the prime minister's own supporters, and she has huge numbers of them outside bangkok, to carry out the same tactic being used by the anti-government movement. that movement has block aided ministries in central bangkok. they are using the same tactic against the building behind me, the anti-corruption commission. they sealed off the gate. they're taking a break. they are waiting for three cement trucks.
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they are going to solidly cement the gate. they argue, as does the prime minister, that the charges against her are politically motivated. they are part of a package of charges that various courts are building against her to try to strip her of power. she was never planning to come today. she's left bangkok. there are a number of threats made against her and her family. but her lawyers have been meeting the commissioners away from here and another place to hear those charges if the commission goes ahead and finds a case against the prime minister once she has been suspended of the charges. that's why they are protesters saying it was too quickly proceed ed with. >> quickly, jonathan, how long could this process take? could it be dragged oregon view taken by the commission in literally a day or two?
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>> reporter: the prime minister has 15 days to respond. then the commission would decide whether the charge would stick. it's quite likely it would. we could see a charge against the prime minister inside a month. there are other charges against members of her party that are also pending. apart from the problems of not being able to complete an election, there have been a number of legal maneuvers that will will strip her of her powers. and they have been asking for an interim government, a change of government from the current one. >> jonathan head in bangkok on the anti-corruption commission which the prime minister has sent her lawyers to attend. well, let me just tell you what's been said at the nato defense meeting. the secretary-general rasmussen has said the actions by the armed groups, whoever their e in crimea, are "dangerous and irresponsible." you're with "bbc world news". still to come, the oscars upon
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us this weekend. we report on a film that examines love and betrayal in israel and the palestinian territories. [ female announcer ] we'll cook all day today, but we're not staying in the kitchen. just start the slow cooker, add meat and pour in campbell's slow cooker sauce. by the time you get home, dinner is practically done. and absolutely delicious. everyone is cooking with new campbell's slow cooker sauces. and absolutely delicious. my dad has aor afib.brillation, he has the most common kind... ...it's not caused by a heart valve problem. dad, it says your afib puts you at 5 times greater risk of a stroke. that's why i take my warfarin every day.
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...ask your doctor about reducing the risk of stroke with pradaxa. you're with "bbc world news" with me nik gowing. armed gunman seize the regional government in crimea. the acting president warns russia against any military aggression inside the country. in a statement issued to russian news agencies and read on russian television, the former president viktor yanukovych asked moscow to guarantee his safety. he still believes he's president. well, let's go to kiev. watching nervously what's happening in crimea to olga. what's your reading of the concerns there with the new interior minister, the new
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defense minister, the new president and potentially the new tpoft about developments with those russian flags appearing on the parliament and administration buildings? >> reporter: well, it seems the atmosphere here in the ukrainian parliament is quite nervous now. people are waiting for news. for several months, the president was showing that russia is not in the political crisis in ukraine. at the same time russian state media were depicting the situation as almost a military turn down in the ukraine. russia was preparing the soil to step in to move. >> ukraine is a massive 46 million people, enormous space. even if they mobilized 150,000 troops for a drill, an exercise,
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that about this particular problem they have inside the navy base there and which could be supplemented, do have a legitimate right to be there? >> reporter: yes, they do have a legitimate right to be here. moreover, they have a legitimate right to move around crimea. let me point your attention to the fact that the troops which are stationed there and troops stationed close to the russian border are one of the best forces that russia has. russian navy s.e.a.l.s are one of the most equipped of the russian army. >> behind her independence square. today is quiet. the oscars take place in hollywood this weekend. one foreign film tackles the highly sensitive subject of
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palestinians who collaborate with israel. we have the details. >> omar brings the complexity of the middle east conflict to this year's oscars. the palestinian contender for the best foreign language film is a love story that becomes a tragedy. after three young palestinians decide to kill an israeli soldier, the main character is arrested and beaten. he then comes under pressure to work as a collaborator with israeli intelligence. the plot turns on betrayals and breakdowns in trust. >> translator: the director uses the cinema and this story of a collaborator to show one of the issues that palestinian have faced. how they deal with betrayals. how the israeli intelligence works on our young men and puts pressure on them to tell their secrets.
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>> over the decades, israel's security forces have relied on information from thousands of palestinian collaborators. collaborators can be recruited in different ways. through coercion or in exchange for money or medical treatment. some work for israel for ideological reasons. for the risks they run are high. they can be disowned by families or killed if they are discovered. they are hated by palestinian society. many former collaborators now live a precarious existence in israel. he is meeting with his lawyer to press for his rights. he's from the west bank and related to a palestinian political figure. over 20 years ago i was imprisoned in israel and become an informant. >> translator: we contributed a lot to the existence of the state of israel, and we continue
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to do so. it's very dangerous. we are aware of that. but being a collaborator is a one-way road. there's no way back once you're involved. >> now, "omar" is ex supposing an international audience to this taboo subject. this acclaimed israeli film "bethlehem" tells the tale of an israeli secret service agency and his young palestinian informant. the moral dilemmas that make it so painful to discuss in real life make for gripping drama on the big screen. the oscars over the weekend. we're getting reports from quoting defense ministry official in south korea that north korea has fired four short-range missiles. the reports are quoting the
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official through reuters, a ministry of defense official in seoul. they were fired out towards the sea off the east coast of korea. more on ukraine and crimea shortly here on "bbc world news". stay with me. 800,000 hours of supercomputing time, 3 million lines of code, 40,000 sets of eyes, or a million sleepless nights. whether it's building the world's most advanced satellite, the space station, or the next leap in unmanned systems. at boeing, one thing never changes. our passion to make it real. ♪ ... you might need to come closer... ... half a world closer!
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world news". our top stories. crimea becomes the next potential flashpoint. russian flags fly over the buildings. armed men seize the regional parliament. ukraine's acting president warns russia against military aggression. parliament needs to confirm a new government with this warning. as the crisis deepens, the former president asks moscow to confirm his safety. and the governor of arizona
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vetoes a bill that would have allowed american business owners to turn away customers for being gay. hello, everyone. a series of fast-moving events in ukraine. domestic security forces on high alert after government buildings in crimea, part of ukraine, was seized overnight by armed men wearing russian colors. the crimea is a potential flashpoint because although part of ukraine, it is also home to the russian naval fleet at a massive base on the black sea. therefore, there is a russian population which is large as well. now a new twist.
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reports from official russian news agencies signal that ex-president viktor yanukovych is in russia after he fled rapidly on friday. he insists he is still rightful head of state. what has happened in simferopol? mark lowen is there. >> reporter: the russian flag flies above the crimean parliament here. we understand overnight about 50 unidentified armed gunmen forced their way inside the parliament building, past the barricades there. there was some exchange of gunfire. they are still holed up inside the parliament building. they are currently under way to try to negotiate an end to the standoff. if we swing around, you can see outside the parliament building that pro-russia demonstrators have gathered. they pushed through police lines, waving flags and then came to outside the parliament building here which was cordoned
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off by police. they are chanting. they are we have waited for this moment for 20 years, that they wanted a united russia. these people say that illegitimate protesters seize the government in ukraine and they say they intend to do exactly the same now here in crimea. >> well, the situation in ukraine is a central focus of a long planned nato defense minister's meeting in brussels. rasmussen expressed the concern about the developments this morning. he urged russia not to take any action which could escalate tension or create misunderstanding. >> we wish to continue our engagement and confirm our support so ukraine on the path of democratic and inclusive
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reforms. we see defense reform and military corporation as key priorities. we stand ready to support ukraine as it strengthens democratic control over the defense sector with effective parliamentary oversight and robust involvement of civil society. ukraine is and remains an important partner for nato. nato is and remains a friend of ukraine. and a sovereign, independent and stable ukraine firmly committed to democracy and the rule of law is and remains key to your atlantic security. this is why i am extremely concerned about the most recent
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developments in crimea. this morning's action by an armed group is dangerous and irresponsible i urge russia not to take any action that could create tension or misunderstanding. i urge the new ukrainian leadership to continue its efforts to establish an inclusive political process that reflects the aspirations of the entire ukrainian people. >> meanwhile, viktor yanukovych until friday the president of ukraine has appeared suddenly in fingerprint and verbally on television in russia saying that he still views himself as president of ukraine. and russia has guaranteed his personal safety from actions of what he called the extremists who seek power in ukraine.
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i asked our diplomatic correspondent in moscow what to make from the apparently deposed president. >> the statement from viktor yanukovych, which was released to all the three main news agencies and read out on the russian rolling news tv channel says he still considers himself ukraine's legal head of state and he believes the sessions taking place in the parliament are not legal. he said given, as he put it, extremists had seized power in ukraine, he asked russia for protection. and separately russian news agencies said they had spoken to source who's said he had that request granted, which certainly seems to be the case if it is written out over the airwaves. he said he thought people in southern and eastern ukraine in the crimea would accept what the government in kiev was doing and
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he was prepared to step in again and work for compromise according to the agreement he signed with the opposition and western powers. he seems to be speaking from an unknown location. we assume it's on russian territory, although his exact whereabouts have not been made , what's your reading there for of the fact that this emerged through one of the official government news agencies and is quoting him directly? where does this mean russia is aligning itself and what position is russia taking with the former president, although he says he's still the president? >> well, it feels like a pretty significant development. there was a lot of speculation about whether or not russia would even accept him. in fact, a senior russian parliamentarian said, no, mr. yanukovych was on russian soil and thought it unlikely that russia would give him sanctuary. here he is not only apparently
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in russia given protection by the russian authorities but having his statements that he thinks the authorities in ukraine are legitimate. it's not just the russian news agency which released this, nik, it was read out on russian television. it seems, given that, to have some authority of the russian state behind it. quite what it means in the battle that's been going on over who should be in control and what should happen in ukraine is difficult to read. but it is slightly ominous given the events in the crimea this morning. these armed men who have taken over the parliament in the government in the crimea not saying very much but clearly putting up a russian flag on taking the side of russian speakers in crimea. we don't know if these events are linked. but it does seem quite odd that the former ukrainian president,
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who let's face it is being denounced all over the place, including here in russia, should suddenly be given airspace on russian television. >> so international fears about the key part of ukraine. it is one in which months skou massive had a strategic interest. there it is right there, crimea. when the soviet union broke up in 1991 and ukraine became independent, russia down here retained basing rights for its enormous black sea. and confirmation that crimea's pro-russian government offices have been seized, there's an ominous question, how might russia decide to defend its interests in ukraine? because, remember, in the last 24 hours, 150,000 troops have gone on exercises and drills right around the western district here. there are combat aircraft which are now confirmed as flying in this area.
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also, there are the rights to deploy anything they want down into the enormous naval pass in sevastopol. how are the developments down in crimea and more widely from russia being seen there? >> it seems the atmosphere here in the ukrainian parliament is quite nervous now. people are waiting for news. for several months, the president of russia was showing it is not in the political crisis in ukraine. at the same time russian state media were depicting the situation as almost a military turndown in ukraine. it seems there are concerns that russia was preparing soil to step in to move. >> ukraine is a massive country of 46 million people of enormous
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space. even if they have mobilized 150,000 troops for a drill and exercise. what about this particular problem which they have inside the navy base there do have a legitimate right to be there. >> they do have a legitimate right to be here. moreover, they have a legitimate right to move around crimea. let me pointed your attention to the fact that the troops, which are stationed there and troops which are stationed close to that side from the russian border, are very -- are one of the best forces that russia has. russian navy s.e.a.l.s are one of the best trained and one of the well equipped parts of the russian army. >> olga there in kiev. a suicide car bomb exploded in the somali capital killing 12 people and wounding several others. al shabaab said it carried out
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the attack in mogadishu. the bbc gave me this reading on the security in mogadishu. >> reporter: yes, exactly. it has been coming back in the last few weeks. a car loaded with explosives was driven near the headquarters of the somali intelligence forces, one of the heavily fortified areas. they attacked the area. and several people, including some of the intelligence forces were killed in the attack. some few days ago an attack was launched on the presidential palace in somalia where several people, including syria government officials were killed. so these kind of attacks are becoming normal in mogadishu did spite two years after al shabaab
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where the attacks have not been this rampant or coming back like this. now, off the coast of italy, the captain of the costa concordia has returned for the first time to the ship. he is accused of manslaughter over the deaths of 32 passengers and crew. off the coast of the italian coast of the island of giglio, it was righted in a massive and extraordinary salvage operation last autumn but it still lies there. alan johnston is there. >> reporter: captain francesco sketino is there. court-appointed experts have been sent out to examine evidence in connection with the captain's manslaughter trial which has been unfolding on the
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mainland for some months now. on the night of the disaster, the captain is accused of having abandoned his ship when hundreds of passengers were aboard. a coast guard commander again and again ordered the captain to get back on the ship. then he refused. but now at least as you watch the captain is at least making his return journey to the costa concordia. that will take him into the flank of the wreck that we would expect him to go up to the bridge area. his command post that he last saw amid the chaos of the cinquing on that tragic when more than 30 people died in the waters around him. >> alan johnston there alongside the wreck of the costa concordia. stay with us on bbc news. still to come, a film that
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examines love and betrayal in israel and the palestinian territories. but after a day spent in the caribbean exploring mayan ruins and playing pirates with you in secret coves, she won't exactly be short on memories. princess cruises. come back new. [ female announcer ] plan your seven-day cruise from just $549. call your travel agent or 1-800-princess. because an empty pan is a blank canvas. [ woman #2 ] to share a moment. [ woman #3 ] to travel the world without leaving home. [ male announcer ] whatever the reason. whatever the dish. make it delicious with swanson.
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. armed gunmen seized regional government in crimea. in a statement issued to russian news agencies the former president viktor yanukovych asked moscow to guarantee his safety. let's go to the u.s. state of arizona where the governor vetoed a draft law to refuse to serve gay people. it would have given business owners legal protection if they refused to serve same-sex
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couples or any other prospective customers. similar other initiatives have been proposed in six other states. none have yet been passed. >> reporter: well, these are the protesters celebrating a decision by governor jan brewer not to allow a bill into law. she announced she would be vetoing a bill that would come through the legislature here from the senate. and the reason behind that this bill was seen as being homophobic. in there it was essentially designed to try to be inclusive in terms of religion, to allow businesses who didn't want to serve people who went against their religion. and to do that without fear of being taken to court. now, of course that would mean if people decided they didn't
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want to serve someone who was gay they would be protected by law. there's out rage from protesters. the chamber of commerce was against this. they said the state has worked very hard to be open for business and this would be seen as a law -- if it was to go into law it would be discriminatory. as a result, they didn't want hadder to pass this. in the end she came out saying this victim would be vetoed. it's one, again, that has been defeated here. well, the oscars take place in hollywood. one foreign film nominated is the palestinian foam "omar." it tackles the highly sense sieve subject of palestinians who collaborate with israel.
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>> "omar" brings the complexity of the middle east conflict to this year's oscars. the palestinian contender for the best foreign language film is a love story that becomes a tragedy. after three young palestinians decide to kill an israeli soldier, the main character is arrested and beaten. he then comes under pressure to work as a collaborator with israeli intelligence. the plot turns on betrayals and breakdowns in trust. >> translator: the director uses the cinema and this story of a collaborator to show one of the issues that palestinian have faced. how they deal with betrayals. how the israeli intelligence works on our young men and puts pressure on them to tell their secrets. >> over the decades, israel's
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security forces have relied on information from thousands of palestinian collaborators. collaborators can be recruited in different ways. through coercion or in exchange for money or medical treatment. some work for israel for ideological reasons. for the risks they run are high. they can be disowned by families or killed if they are discovered. they are hated by palestinian society. many former collaborators now live a precarious existence in israel. he is meeting with his lawyer to press for his rights. he's from the west bank and related to a palestinian political figure. over 20 years ago he was imprisoned in israel and became an informant. >> translator: we contributed a lot to the existence of the state of israel, and we continue to do so. it's very dangerous.
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we are aware of that. but being a collaborator is a one-way road. there's no way back once you're involved. >> now, "omar" is exposing an international audience to this taboo subject. but it's not the only movie to take it on. this acclaimed israeli film "bethlehem" tells the tale of an israeli secret service agency and his young palestinian informant. the divide loyalties and moral dilemmas that make it so painful to discuss in real life make for gripping drama on the big screen. the oscars over the weekend. a man-eating tiger claimed the lives of ten people. most have been farm workers. six weeks after the tiger first struck, hunters are no closer to
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catching it. >> reporter: getting ready to hunt a man-eating tiger with a license to kill. the authorities have called in a veteran of more than 40 hunts for big cats that have gone rogue. the tiger he and his team are tracking has already killed 10 people. in the village where it last struck live has come to a virtue wall stand still. after her grandfather was eaten alive while working in the fields. >> translator: we are living in terror now. even if we see a leaf shake on a tree, we think it's a tiger. they have got to kill it. >>reporter: tigers do not naturally go after humans. but attacks are becoming more common as humans press in. they have been hiding inside
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dense fields of sugar cane like this. even just a few feet inside, it's impossible to see anything, until it's too late. and many of the tiger's victims have been farm workers. and this area is literally covered with dense sugar cane fields. the hunters carry on into the night using a powerful search beam. then they see something. there's movement on the river bed. but it's not a tiger. the next morning, though, a new lead. they found fresh tiger tracks. >> they became aware of this tiger by the chief.
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humans encroach on their territory. >> even 10 years or 15 years back it was much, much bigger. you take somebody's home away, he's going to be on the streets. >> with the tiger still on the loose, everyone is on age. it's got a taste for human flesh now. that means it's likely to come back for more. let me give you an update of what you have been reporting. the south korean defense ministry said north korea fired four short-range missiles towards the east coast. north korea fired the missiles at 5:42 p.m. from a mountain side just north of the border with the south. they provided no information on the reason for the firing. north korea has in the past
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fired short-range missiles into the sea as part of military exercises. more on that as we get it. the prime minister designate has insisted they will and remain a unified country. russian flags are being raised. >> we are committed to the territorial integrity and unity of my government. and the new government will do everything and use all legal means to stabilize the situation in crimea and to convince the entire world and all ukrainian neighbors that ukraine is a sovereign, united country. >> and just to tell you that there is evidence of something happening more around simferopol
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in the crimea, this is the former president, or is he still the current president yanukovych has been quoted by russian official news agencies saying he's still in charge and blames extremists for producing in stability in the country he fled on saturday. you're with "bbc world news". i'm nik gowing. thanks for joining me. bye-bye. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. and only national is ranked highest in car rental customer satisfaction by j.d. power. (natalie) ooooh, i like your style. (vo) so do we, business pro. so do we. go national. go like a pro. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. [ m'm... ] great taste. [ tapping ] sounds good. campbell's healthy request. m'm! m'm! good.® campbell's healthy request.
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my dad has aor afib.brillation, he has the most common kind... ...it's not caused by a heart valve problem. dad, it says your afib puts you at 5 times greater risk of a stroke. that's why i take my warfarin every day. but it looks like maybe we should ask your doctor about pradaxa. in a clinical trial, pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate)... ...was proven superior to warfarin at reducing the risk of stroke. and unlike warfarin, with no regular blood tests or dietary restrictions. hey thanks for calling my doctor. sure. pradaxa is not for people with artificial heart valves. don't stop taking pradaxa without talking to your doctor. stopping increases your risk of stroke. ask your doctor if you need to stop pradaxa before surgery or a medical or dental procedure. pradaxa can cause serious, sometimes fatal, bleeding. don't take pradaxa if you have abnormal bleeding or have had a heart valve replaced. seek immediate medical care for unexpected signs of bleeding, like unusual bruising. pradaxa may increase your bleeding risk if you're 75 or older, have a bleeding condition or stomach ulcer, take aspirin, nsaids, or blood thinners... ...or if you have kidney problems, especially if you take certain medicines.
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tell your doctors about all medicines you take. pradaxa side effects include indigestion, stomach pain, upset, or burning. if you or someone you love has afib not caused by a heart valve problem... ...ask your doctor about reducing the risk of stroke with pradaxa.
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i cthis year aloneore places offi hit new york...ist. and texas! see, hotwire checks the competition's rates every day... so they can guarantee their low hotel prices. ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e ♪ hotwire.com you're watching "gmt" on "bbc world news". i'm david eades. our top stories. a rising tide of tension in ukraine as the crimean peninsula moves center stage for protest and aggression. masked men seized government buildings in the capital, raising the russian flag on ukrainian soil. as russia itself conducts military drills on the border, the acting president tells moscow it must keep its forces in crimea on base. as for the ukraine's ousted